SCCADVASAdamond

Communications Coordinator

Jul 092014
 

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SCCADVASA would like to congratulate Becky Callaham, her staff and Board of Directors on the opening of their third shelter in Oconee County. The Ribbon Cutting celebration, July 8th, was attended by over 400 members of the community including South Carolina Senator Thomas Alexander, the Oconee County Sheriff Mike Crenshaw, and other members of the Oconee Shelter Campaign Committee. The shelter will be the first of its kind in the county and will provide services to all families in Oconee County. In March of 2013 Safe Harbor launched a capital campaign to raise $990,000 to open a 24-hour emergency shelter for victims of domestic violence and their children in Oconee County. With generous donations from within Oconee County and throughout the Upstate of South Carolina, Safe Harbor was able to raise over $1.3 million dollars for the purchase of a house and 3 years of operational expenses.

Attendees at the celebration were welcomed by John Powell who also co-chaired the Oconee Shelter Campaign Committee, followed by various supporters and advocates for Safe Harbor and their efforts to build a shelter in Oconee County. Jim and Elisabeth Gadd, Oconee Shelter Campaign Committee members, shared a story of a young girl who wanted to help so she donated ten dollars from her lemonade stand. The theme of team and community was prevalent in all of the remarks given throughout the celebration. We think this was best expressed in a quote read by Elisabeth Gadd, “Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful committed citizens can change the world; indeed, it’s the only thing that ever has.” -Margaret Mead

Congratulations to Safe Harbor and congratulations to the people of Oconee County!

 

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You can view the entire event on Safe Harbor’s Youtube page, here.

 Posted by on July 9, 2014 Blog Comments Off
Jul 072014
 

You can now support SCCADVASA when you are doing your online shopping with AmazonSmile.

Amazon will donate 0.5% of the price of your purchases to the South Carolina Coalition Against Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault. AmazonSmile is a simple and automatic way for you to support us every time you shop, at no cost to you. When you shop at smile.amazon.com, you’ll find the exact same low prices, vast selection and convenient shopping experience as Amazon.com, with the added bonus that Amazon will donate a portion of the purchase price to us at SCCADVASA.

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To shop at AmazonSmile simply go to smile.amazon.com from the web browser on your computer or mobile device. You may also want to add a bookmark to AmazonSmile to make it even easier to return and start your shopping at AmazonSmile.

Please use AmazonSmile in an effort to continue your support of the South Carolina Coalition Against Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault.

Don’t forget that you can always directly donate to SCCADVASA here.

 Posted by on July 7, 2014 Blog Comments Off
Jun 272014
 

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       Since 1989 Elmire Raven has given unwavering support and advocacy at My  Sister’s  House in the Tri-County area. Her passion and dedication for the work, that  has  helped  hundreds of families, is inspirational. Her 25 years of service was  honored by  proclamation of “Elmire Raven Day” by the mayors of Charleston, North  Charleston, Mt.  Pleasant and Summerville on June 26th. There was also a  recognition ceremony in  honor of Elmire held by My Sister’s House Inc. There were  remarks from numerous friends and colleagues of Elmire including SCCADVASA’s  very own Training Coordinator, Donna Thompson. The Mount Moriah Praise &  Worship Team performed and a presentation of gifts was made by Melva Zinaich, My  Sister’s House Board President.

 We admire her dedication to making the state a violence-free South Carolina. She  has become an influential non-profit leader, educator, advocate for victim rights,  and an ambassador for survivors of domestic violence.

 We at SCCADVASA would like to  say thank you and congratulations to Elmire!

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 Posted by on June 27, 2014 Blog Comments Off
May 282014
 

SCCADVASA is thrilled to announce our new Executive Director, Sara Barber, who will officially begin on Monday, June 9th!

“When the executive transition committee was formed last year, we made a commitment to SCCADVASA that we would find the right candidate to bring the new mission and vision to fruition,” said Kristin Dubrowski, Board Chair. “We took this commitment very seriously and went through many rounds of resumes and interviews – and at times even questioned whether our standards were too high. Fortunately, Sara proved that our standards weren’t too high, but that we just hadn’t found the right candidate yet. Sara’s passion for the work, her strategic problem-solving skills, her thirst for knowledge and her diplomatic demeanor will make her an ideal leader for SCCADVASA.”

Sara Barber, SCCADVASA Executive Director

Sara Barber, SCCADVASA Executive Director

Sara has a Certificate in Nonprofit Management, an M.A. in Criminology and Criminal Justice and will complete United Way’s Blueprint for Leadership program this June. Sara also brings nearly 14 years of experience working in the DV field to SCCADVASA and is currently the executive director of the Domestic Abuse Center (DAC) in Columbia. Throughout her employment at DAC her focus has been on victim safety and offender accountability. Sara has also been an invaluable member of SCCADVASA’s legislative committee for the 2014 legislative session and is committed to furthering her knowledge of sexual assault issues.

 

 

 Posted by on May 28, 2014 Blog, Domestic Violence, Membership, Sexual Assault Comments Off
Nov 062013
 
Credit: AR Wear
Credit: AR Wear.

An apparel company has created a new type of underwear that they claim protects women from sexual assault. Tara Culp-Ressler of ThinkProgress.org explains why this is such a bad idea.

A company named AR Wear is making waves by marketing “a clothing line offering wearable protection for when things go wrong.” The line includes several different types of underwear and shorts that are intended to be difficult for a sexual predator to remove, and the founders explain that could help women feel safer when they’re “going out on a blind date, taking an evening run, ‘clubbing,’ traveling in unfamiliar countries, and any other activity that might make one anxious about the possibility of an assault.” AR Wear has currently raised about half of its $50,000 fundraising goal on the crowdfunding site IndieGoGo.

It’s fairly clear that AR Wear’s founders have the best of intentions. In a press release about the crowdfunding campaign, they explain that they want to help women reclaim control over what happens to their bodies. And on theirIndieGoGo site, they note that as long as sexual predators are still out there, it’s important to protect women from them.

Nonetheless, their effort has been widely criticized, derided as a new type of chastity belt for the “modern rape victim.” That’s not because people are opposed to preventing rape, of course — it’s because AR Wear seems to be missing a few crucial points about the reality of sexual assault. Here’s what the campaign gets wrong:

1. Rape isn’t an accident.

From the onset, the tagline of AR Wear’s campaign signals that this isn’t exactly the right framing for effectively tackling sexual assault. Marketing anti-rape underwear “for when things go wrong” suggests that sexual assault is an accident, or simply a night of partying gone sour. It subtly frames the incident in terms of the victim’s bad luck rather than in terms of the perpetrator’s decision to rape. In fact, sexual assault isn’t a slip-up; it’s a crime that a rapist has consciously committed.

“A woman or girl who is wearing one of our garments will be sending a clear message to her would-be assailant that she is NOT consenting. We believe that this undeniable message can help to prevent a significant number of rapes,” AR Wear notes. That’s not exactly right, either. Extensive research has shown that the people who commit rape aren’t simply confused about whether or not their victim consented. Rapists typically carefully select their victims and use a variety of tactics to manipulate them in order to accomplish their goal of sexual assault. In fact, especially when it comes to date rape, it’s often the victims who are confused about what constitutes consent, and that’s how the rapist gets away with it.

To read the full article, go to http://thinkprogress.org/health/2013/11/05/2889411/anti-rape-underwear-sexual-assault/.

 Posted by on November 6, 2013 SC Says No More Tagged with: , , ,  Comments Off
Nov 042013
 

As we begin November after recognizing October as Domestic Violence Awareness Month, SC’s #1 National ranking for the number of women killed by men is still fresh in our minds. More than anything, we want to know, “What can we do to prevent this from happening?”

The answer rests in the primary prevention of sexual and intimate partner violence. Primary prevention of intimate partner violence (IPV) and sexual assault is a systematic process promoting healthy environments and behaviors, resulting in the reduction of the likelihood and the frequency of intimate partner violence and sexual assault. The root of these crimes lies in power and control over another individual, and primary prevention of these crimes focuses on addressing the power and control to which a perpetrator thinks they are entitled—at a very basic, system-wide level.

These system-wide levels are individual, relationship, community and institutions & society. Only when we begin to work in all of these areas will we begin to see change, and a lowered rate of IPV and sexual violence.

Stay tuned to the SCSaysNoMore Blog for specific discussions and examples of things you and your community can do at each of these levels. In the meantime:

What can you do at any of these levels to address intimate partner and sexual violence? Are there opportunities in your own community to begin addressing some of the attitudes and behaviors that encourage and support the perpetration of these crimes?

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 Posted by on November 4, 2013 SC Says No More Tagged with: , , ,  Comments Off