Sep 092014
 

In light of recent news regarding professional football athletes, we want to say thank you to some of the biggest names in South Carolina football.

This is a PSA from 2011 that coaches Spurrier, Swinney and Pough speak out against domestic violence.

 

This is Coach Spurrier’s most recent comments on domestic violence during a press conference.

Thanks to Coach Spurrier for his continued focus on holding perpetrators of domestic violence accountable for their violence.  We appreciate his challenge to others to do the same.

 Posted by on September 9, 2014 Domestic Violence Comments Off
Aug 252014
 

“More than 300 women were shot, stabbed, strangled, beaten, bludgeoned or burned to death over the past decade by men in South Carolina, dying at a rate of one every 12 days while the state does little to stem the carnage from domestic abuse.”

post-and-courier

The Post and Courier decided to write about a cultural private matter, the happenings between a married couple in their home.

We, at SCCADVASA, want to commend the Post and Courier and their Project Team for creating an emotional and accurate series on domestic abuse homicides. The statistics continue to place South Carolina in the top ten states that nationally place for the rate of women killed by men. The Post and Courier uses a multimedia approach to bring into light the violence against women in the state. Reaching out of to victims, counselors, police, prosecutors and judges to create a piece that speaks from the cycle of abuse and violence to the ending of life for some victims.

The Post and Courier printed each story over 5 days, from Wednesday through Sunday, but the whole package is available on their website.

We recommend that every South Carolinian read/see this eye opening piece of work.

Please contact your local program, if you or someone you know who needs resources. Or you can contact the National Domestic Violence Hotline: 1.800.799.SAFE (7233)/ National Sexual Assault Hotline: 1.800.656.HOPE (4673)

 

 Posted by on August 25, 2014 Blog Comments Off
Aug 122014
 

The University of South Carolina (USC) Student Health Services is hiring for the position of: Associate Director, Sexual Assault & Relationship Violence Prevention

In the department: Student Health Services

Location: Columbia, South Carolina

 

The Associate Director, Sexual Assault & Relationship Violence Prevention is responsible for the planning, organizing and implementation of comprehensive sexual assault, advocacy, violence prevention programs and services for the university community, including strategic planning, budgeting, research and grant writing. Organize and build capacity of community-based violence prevention efforts to understand and prevent sexual assault and interpersonal violence. Supports and incorporates the Healthy Carolina initiative in all programs, activities and marketing strategies. Ensures that programs and services meet or exceed standards and guidelines established through Healthy Campus 2020, Title IX and the Clery Act. Utilizes Healthy Campus 2020 objectives and NCHA data to inform the strategic plan.  For additional information, copy and paste the following link into your browser: uscjobs.sc.edu/applicants/Central?quickFind=74549 (Requisition number 007867).

 

The University of South Carolina (USC) Student Health Services embraces a holistic and collaborative approach to healthcare by offering primary care, preventive programs, wellness education, violence prevention, and mental health and counseling services to our campus community. Our mission is to enhance the educational experience by modifying or removing health-related barriers to learning, promoting optimal wellness and enabling individuals to make informed health decisions. We offer uncomplicated access to quality healthcare provided by compassionate staff dedicated to making healthcare accessible and affordable for students through ethically sound practice, confidentiality and integrity. Our accreditation through the Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care (AAAHC) demonstrates our commitment to quality of care and service delivery. Student Health Services’ continued expansion of services and programs will soon be supported through the construction of a 100,000 square foot, state-of-the-art facility that will bring our five service areas into one centralized location, further supporting our mission of providing holistic healthcare.

 

To learn more about University of South Carolina Student Health Services, visit http://www.sa.sc.edu/shs/.

 Posted by on August 12, 2014 Blog Comments Off
Aug 062014
 

The Senate Judiciary Committee last week held its first-ever hearing on the ties between gun policy and domestic violence, deemed an important step in efforts to protect women.

Members of a witness panel discussed possible measures that would close the loopholes in current federal law, including the use of temporary restraining orders to prevent convicted stalkers and perpetrators of domestic violence from purchasing firearms. They mentioned possible next steps in passing additional legislation in the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) to protect women from gun violence. A new bill focused on the issue was proposed by Sen. Amy Klobuchar, a Democrat from Minnesota.

The panel included Dr. Jacquelyn Campbell, Professor at Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing; Dr. Joyce Lee Malcolm, Patrick Henry Professor of Constitutional Law and the Second Amendment at George Mason University School of Law; Christopher Schmaling, Sheriff of Racine County, Wisconsin; Hon. Seamus McCaffery, Justice of the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania and Elvin Daniel, from McHenry, Illinois

On October, 12, 2012, Elvin Daniel received a call no one should have to receive. His sister, Zina had been shot and killed by her abusive ex-husband while she was at work. Two other women were also murdered, and four more were injured in this violent incident. Although federal law prohibited Zina’s husband from legally purchasing a gun, he found an unlicensed seller online, and for $500 was able to buy the handgun he used to kill three people.

Download a copy of Elvin Daniel’s full testimony here

Sheriff Christopher Schmaling of Racine, WI has spent 19 years in law enforcement. He speaks of experiences of working domestic violence incidents that have opened his eyes to the reality of the role gun violence plays in abusive relationships and the “heightened risk” such calls pose to his officers.

Download a copy of Chris Schmaling’s full testimony here

On July 30, Elvin and Sheriff Schmaling, who both identify themselves as conservative Republicans and strong supporters of the Second Amendment, testified to the Senate Judiciary Committee in support of S.1290 which would close loopholes in current federal laws. Their passionate and personal testimonies, supported by the statistical data provided by Dr. Jacqueline Campbell, eloquently spoke to the need for common sense laws that will provide protection to victims of domestic violence and stalking.

You can watch the full Judiciary Hearing here: VAWA Next Steps: Protecting Women from Gun Violence

America’s porous gun laws put women’s lives at risk. In fact, this country is the most dangerous country in the developed world for women when it comes to gun violence. While federal law prohibits convicted domestic abusers and abusers subject to domestic violence restraining orders from owning guns, gaps in federal law still make it too easy for dangerous abusers to access guns.

Let’s look at the numbers, nationally. Every month, an average of 48 American women are shot to death by a current or former husband or boyfriend. American women are 11 times more likely to be murdered with a gun than women in other developed countries. The presence of a gun in a domestic violence situation makes it five times more likely that the woman will be killed.

Let’s look at the numbers, locally. 61 women were murdered by males in South Carolina in 2011, according to the Violence Policy Center. These numbers make South Carolina 1st in the United States for violence against women. For homicides in which the weapon used could be identified, 57 percent of female victims were shot and killed by guns. For homicides in which the victim to offender relationship could be identified, 93 percent of female victims were murdered by someone they knew.

SCCADVASA’s Executive Director, Sara Barber, and Director of Prevention and Education, Rebecca Williams-Agee represented SCCADVASA and the state of South Carolina at the hearings and visits to various congress member’s offices.

 

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 Posted by on August 6, 2014 Blog Comments Off
Jul 092014
 

safe harbor logo

SCCADVASA would like to congratulate Becky Callaham, her staff and Board of Directors on the opening of their third shelter in Oconee County. The Ribbon Cutting celebration, July 8th, was attended by over 400 members of the community including South Carolina Senator Thomas Alexander, the Oconee County Sheriff Mike Crenshaw, and other members of the Oconee Shelter Campaign Committee. The shelter will be the first of its kind in the county and will provide services to all families in Oconee County. In March of 2013 Safe Harbor launched a capital campaign to raise $990,000 to open a 24-hour emergency shelter for victims of domestic violence and their children in Oconee County. With generous donations from within Oconee County and throughout the Upstate of South Carolina, Safe Harbor was able to raise over $1.3 million dollars for the purchase of a house and 3 years of operational expenses.

Attendees at the celebration were welcomed by John Powell who also co-chaired the Oconee Shelter Campaign Committee, followed by various supporters and advocates for Safe Harbor and their efforts to build a shelter in Oconee County. Jim and Elisabeth Gadd, Oconee Shelter Campaign Committee members, shared a story of a young girl who wanted to help so she donated ten dollars from her lemonade stand. The theme of team and community was prevalent in all of the remarks given throughout the celebration. We think this was best expressed in a quote read by Elisabeth Gadd, “Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful committed citizens can change the world; indeed, it’s the only thing that ever has.” -Margaret Mead

Congratulations to Safe Harbor and congratulations to the people of Oconee County!

 

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You can view the entire event on Safe Harbor’s Youtube page, here.

 Posted by on July 9, 2014 Blog Comments Off
Jul 072014
 

You can now support SCCADVASA when you are doing your online shopping with AmazonSmile.

Amazon will donate 0.5% of the price of your purchases to the South Carolina Coalition Against Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault. AmazonSmile is a simple and automatic way for you to support us every time you shop, at no cost to you. When you shop at smile.amazon.com, you’ll find the exact same low prices, vast selection and convenient shopping experience as Amazon.com, with the added bonus that Amazon will donate a portion of the purchase price to us at SCCADVASA.

AmazonSmile-Logo-01

To shop at AmazonSmile simply go to smile.amazon.com from the web browser on your computer or mobile device. You may also want to add a bookmark to AmazonSmile to make it even easier to return and start your shopping at AmazonSmile.

Please use AmazonSmile in an effort to continue your support of the South Carolina Coalition Against Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault.

Don’t forget that you can always directly donate to SCCADVASA here.

 Posted by on July 7, 2014 Blog Comments Off
Jun 272014
 

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       Since 1989 Elmire Raven has given unwavering support and advocacy at My  Sister’s  House in the Tri-County area. Her passion and dedication for the work, that  has  helped  hundreds of families, is inspirational. Her 25 years of service was  honored by  proclamation of “Elmire Raven Day” by the mayors of Charleston, North  Charleston, Mt.  Pleasant and Summerville on June 26th. There was also a  recognition ceremony in  honor of Elmire held by My Sister’s House Inc. There were  remarks from numerous friends and colleagues of Elmire including SCCADVASA’s  very own Training Coordinator, Donna Thompson. The Mount Moriah Praise &  Worship Team performed and a presentation of gifts was made by Melva Zinaich, My  Sister’s House Board President.

 We admire her dedication to making the state a violence-free South Carolina. She  has become an influential non-profit leader, educator, advocate for victim rights,  and an ambassador for survivors of domestic violence.

 We at SCCADVASA would like to  say thank you and congratulations to Elmire!

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 Posted by on June 27, 2014 Blog Comments Off
May 282014
 

SCCADVASA is thrilled to announce our new Executive Director, Sara Barber, who will officially begin on Monday, June 9th!

“When the executive transition committee was formed last year, we made a commitment to SCCADVASA that we would find the right candidate to bring the new mission and vision to fruition,” said Kristin Dubrowski, Board Chair. “We took this commitment very seriously and went through many rounds of resumes and interviews – and at times even questioned whether our standards were too high. Fortunately, Sara proved that our standards weren’t too high, but that we just hadn’t found the right candidate yet. Sara’s passion for the work, her strategic problem-solving skills, her thirst for knowledge and her diplomatic demeanor will make her an ideal leader for SCCADVASA.”

Sara Barber, SCCADVASA Executive Director

Sara Barber, SCCADVASA Executive Director

Sara has a Certificate in Nonprofit Management, an M.A. in Criminology and Criminal Justice and will complete United Way’s Blueprint for Leadership program this June. Sara also brings nearly 14 years of experience working in the DV field to SCCADVASA and is currently the executive director of the Domestic Abuse Center (DAC) in Columbia. Throughout her employment at DAC her focus has been on victim safety and offender accountability. Sara has also been an invaluable member of SCCADVASA’s legislative committee for the 2014 legislative session and is committed to furthering her knowledge of sexual assault issues.

 

 

 Posted by on May 28, 2014 Blog, Domestic Violence, Membership, Sexual Assault Comments Off
May 202014
 

COLUMBIA, SOUTH CAROLINA – May 19, 2014 – To raise awareness about domestic violence and sexual assault, and honor the programs and staff that work with these victims, the South Carolina Coalition Against Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault (SCCADVASA) will host their Annual Meeting on Thursday, May 22, 2014 at 12pm at the Hampton Inn & Suites Columbia Southeast Ft. Jackson.

“Once a year, we come together as a Coalition to honor all of those who work with the most vulnerable victims in our state. This year, in addition to announcing our Community Award recipients, we are excited to announce our new Executive Director!” says SCCADVASA Interim Executive Director, Colleen Campbell Bozard. “After a long and exhaustive search, we are thrilled with our choice and can’t wait to introduce the next leader in the fight to make South Carolina safer for everyone.”

The South Carolina Coalition Against Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault (SCCADVASA), is a statewide coalition made up of the 23 domestic violence and sexual assault advocacy programs in South Carolina. Since 1981, SCCADVASA has been a leader in representing the critical needs of survivors and their families. The mission of SCCADVASA is to end domestic violence and sexual assault in South Carolina by influencing public policy, advocating for social change and building capacity of member programs, organizations and communities across the state. To learn more about SCCADVASA, please visit www.sccadvasa.org.

For more information about SCCADVASA, its member programs, or domestic violence and sexual assault, contact SCCADVASA at (803) 256-2900 or visit us online at http://sccadvasa.org.

 

annualmeeting

 Posted by on May 20, 2014 Blog, Upcoming Events Comments Off
Mar 072014
 

For Immediate Release:  March 7, 2014

Contact for SCCADVASA: Interim Executive Director, Colleen Campbell Bozard, 803-256-2900mailto:executivedirector@sccadvasa.org

Contact for NNEDV:  Monica McLaughlin, 202-543-5566; mmclaughlin@nnedv.org

 NATIONWIDE SURVEY REVEALS URGENT NEED FOR INCREASED FUNDING FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE SERVICE PROVIDERS

 Nearly 66,000 Domestic Violence Victims Helped On a Single Day, But Almost 10,000 Requests for Help Go Unanswered

 COLUMBIA, SOUTH CAROLINA – March 7, 2014 – Yesterday, the National Network to End Domestic Violence (NNEDV) released a new research report that found, in a single 24-hour period, more than 66,000 victims of domestic violence received help and support from service organizations in the United States, yet nearly 10,000 more who needed assistance could not be helped due to a lack of adequate resources.

In South Carolina, 475 victims received services in that 24-hour period, but 16 could not be helped because local programs here in South Carolina didn’t have sufficient resources.

“Domestic violence is still not a priority in South Carolina,” says SCCADVASA Interim Executive Director, Colleen Campbell Bozard. “This was clearly evidenced by the recent publication by the Violence Policy Center that ranked South Carolina #1 in the nation for women who are killed by men, more than double the national average.  South Carolina has been ranked in the top ten for ten years and has ranked #1 for a total of three years.”

The report, “Domestic Violence Counts 2013: A 24-hour Census of Domestic Violence Shelters and Services,” examined a random day, September 17, 2013, and collected information from 1649 domestic violence programs throughout the United States from midnight to midnight on that day. It identifies needs that were met and unmet on that day and provides a snapshot of how budget cuts are affecting the staffing and resources of these organizations.

Key findings for South Carolina include this 24-hour data from September 17, 2013:

  •  135 calls to domestic violence hotlines were answered
  • 131 individuals were educated on domestic violence during trainings conducted by local programs
  • 16 requests from domestic violence victims were turned down because programs did not have the resources to provide them, including requests for emergency shelter, housing, transportation, childcare and legal representation
  • The majority of unmet requests were from victims who had chosen to flee their abusers, and were seeking safe emergency or transitional housing
  •  Across South Carolina, 13 staff positions were eliminated in the past year and most of these positions were direct services, such as shelter or legal advocates, so there were fewer advocates to answer calls for help.

“Every day in this country, victims of domestic violence are bravely reaching out for help, and it’s essential that they have somewhere safe to go,” said Kim Gandy, President and CEO of the NNEDV.  “We have made so much progress toward ending violence and giving survivors avenues for safety.  But continued program cuts jeopardize that progress and jeopardize the lives of victims.”

“Every day in this country, victims of domestic violence are bravely reaching out for help, and it’s essential that they have somewhere safe to go,” said Kim Gandy, President and CEO of the NNEDV.  “We have made so much progress toward ending violence and giving survivors avenues for safety.  But continued program cuts jeopardize that progress and jeopardize the lives of victims.”

When nationwide program providers were asked what most likely happens when services are not available, 60% said the most likely outcome was that victims returned to their abusers, 27% said the victims become homeless, and 11% said that victims end up living in their cars.

The research also shows initial impacts of the new guidelines in the Affordable Care Act, which require healthcare providers to screen patients for domestic violence and refer victims to services. Data collected for this study shows that since these guidelines have been in effect, there has been an 18.5% increase in referrals received nationwide by domestic violence programs; a number that experts predict will only increase as the ACA takes full effect.

The number of unmet needs is related to the financial resources of these programs. In 2013, 1,696 staff positions were cut due to funding reductions, an average of 1.2 staff per program. Of the staff that were cut in 2013, 70 percent were direct service positions, such as case managers, advocates, shelter staff, and child advocates.

 “We know that to be successful, it takes a full community response to alter the growing problem of domestic violence. Education, outreach and training using promising programs in the US as examples for the unique and sometimes complicated crime of domestic violence is critical. SC needs to provide meaningful resources to help victims, not excuses and cut programs,” said SCCADVASA Interim Executive Director Colleen Campbell Bozard.

Download the full “Domestic Violence Counts 2013” census report at www.nnedv.org/census

 ‐ ### ‐

About SCCADVASA

The South Carolina Coalition Against Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault (SCCADVASA), is a statewide coalition made up of the 23 domestic violence and sexual assault advocacy programs in South Carolina. Since 1981, SCCADVASA has been a leader in representing the critical needs of survivors and their families. The mission of SCCADVASA is to end domestic violence and sexual assault in South Carolina by influencing public policy, advocating for social change and building capacity of member programs, organizations and communities across the state. To learn more about SCCADVASA, please visit www.sccadvasa.org.

  About NNEDV

The National Network to End Domestic Violence (NNEDV), a 501(c)(3) social change organization, is dedicated to creating a social, political and economic environment in which domestic violence, sexual assault, dating violence and stalking no longer exist. As the leading voice for domestic violence victims and their allies, NNEDV members include all 56 of the state and territorial coalitions against domestic violence, including over 2,000 local programs. NNEDV has been a premiere national organization advancing the movement against domestic violence for almost 25 years, having led efforts among domestic violence advocates and survivors in urging Congress to pass the landmark Violence Against Women Act of 1994. To learn more about NNEDV, please visit www.nnedv.org.

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 Posted by on March 7, 2014 Blog, Domestic Violence Comments Off